Gia Pets

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Home made dog food with a recipe for Tuesday Tuna Special

Up until dog kibble was invented, all dogs were fed at home from food produced at home.  Granted, some dogs were probably severely malnourished, some were starving, and others were as fat as could be.   Feeding your dog “human food” was frowned upon in general, right up until the contaminated dog food was recalled, and suddenly, it’s very fashionable and responsible to make your own dog food.

From a practical point of view, making your own dog food can provide a quality diet at a very low cost, if its done right.  You know exactly what is going into it, and what kind of quality it really has.  It’s also a great way to use up items that may have been lurking in your freezer a bit too long, or are at risk of spoiling in your refrigerator.  Never ever feed your dog spoiled food–it will make him or her just as sick as it would make you!

Canine allergies are just as much an issue as human ones, and while many canine allergies are environmental in nature, they can also be food related.  Limiting the ingredients can help you and your veterinarian determine what the problem foods may be.  Home made foods make this easy.  Want to go on a turkey and barley diet?  Turkey comes in ground form at the grocery store, and barley is found near the rice and pasta normally!  Perhaps you think that pork and sweet potatoes would be better?  That too is an option!  Whatever ingredients you choose (check with your veterinarian for suggestions) can become your dog’s food.  All organic?  That’s also an option!

Just like humans, dogs are suffering from obesity at higher rates than ever before, and just like humans, that isn’t healthy.  Reducing calories while keeping a large quantity is often a need for the eager chowhound on a reducing diet.  High water content meals make that easier, by replacing much of the denser calories of kibble with the water that has no calories.  Make sure Fido has plenty of water in his or her meals, limit the fats, and stick with great ingredients that make them feel full, and those pounds will fall away easier.  Using more vegetables and fruits than grains will help too.  (Try carrots, sweet potatoes, summer squash, green beans, peas, apples, pears, peaches, blueberries)

The basic formula is rather simple–about 1/3 proteins such as dairy, meat, and eggs and about 2/3 carbohydrates such as grains, fruits, and vegetables.  In dogs, cholesterol is not a worry, and their bodies can’t tell the difference between high quality extra virgin olive oil and plain old beef fat.  The choices are infinite within those parameters though.  Grains, vegetables and most fruits should be cooked, but the proteins (except for eggs) usually can be served raw, if you so desire.  Contrary to the old wives’ tale…raw meat will not turn your dog into a killer either.

Creative cooking has no limits, and your dog’s palate may be less discerning than your significant other’s is.  All three of mine will dine quite happily on a dish of Tuesday Tuna Special, even if we weren’t interested in sharing!

Tuesday Tuna Special

  • 2 c. rice
  • 3 c. water
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 can tuna
  • 1 can green beans

Bring water to a boil, add rice and cover.  Cook on medium low heat until done (about 20 minutes for white rice.)  Remove from heat and fluff with fork.  Stir raw eggs into hot rice, replace lid and let sit for about 1 hr or until just warm.  Dump in (liquid and all) tuna and green beans.  Stir to combine.    Refrigerate or freeze unused portions until ready to use.  (Refrigerated, it will keep for about 4 days.)

Serving sizes depend on size and energy needs of individual dogs.  In addition, the high water content of this food in comparison with dry kibble makes comparing the amount of this dish fed per dog to kibble difficult–it will be a much more substantial looking serving than the kibble is.  This recipe feeds 1 large dog, 1 medium dog, and 1 toy dog at my house.  They all also love it–not even the green beans are discarded!

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