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Home made dog food with a recipe for Tuesday Tuna Special

Up until dog kibble was invented, all dogs were fed at home from food produced at home.  Granted, some dogs were probably severely malnourished, some were starving, and others were as fat as could be.   Feeding your dog “human food” was frowned upon in general, right up until the contaminated dog food was recalled, and suddenly, it’s very fashionable and responsible to make your own dog food.

From a practical point of view, making your own dog food can provide a quality diet at a very low cost, if its done right.  You know exactly what is going into it, and what kind of quality it really has.  It’s also a great way to use up items that may have been lurking in your freezer a bit too long, or are at risk of spoiling in your refrigerator.  Never ever feed your dog spoiled food–it will make him or her just as sick as it would make you!

Canine allergies are just as much an issue as human ones, and while many canine allergies are environmental in nature, they can also be food related.  Limiting the ingredients can help you and your veterinarian determine what the problem foods may be.  Home made foods make this easy.  Want to go on a turkey and barley diet?  Turkey comes in ground form at the grocery store, and barley is found near the rice and pasta normally!  Perhaps you think that pork and sweet potatoes would be better?  That too is an option!  Whatever ingredients you choose (check with your veterinarian for suggestions) can become your dog’s food.  All organic?  That’s also an option!

Just like humans, dogs are suffering from obesity at higher rates than ever before, and just like humans, that isn’t healthy.  Reducing calories while keeping a large quantity is often a need for the eager chowhound on a reducing diet.  High water content meals make that easier, by replacing much of the denser calories of kibble with the water that has no calories.  Make sure Fido has plenty of water in his or her meals, limit the fats, and stick with great ingredients that make them feel full, and those pounds will fall away easier.  Using more vegetables and fruits than grains will help too.  (Try carrots, sweet potatoes, summer squash, green beans, peas, apples, pears, peaches, blueberries)

The basic formula is rather simple–about 1/3 proteins such as dairy, meat, and eggs and about 2/3 carbohydrates such as grains, fruits, and vegetables.  In dogs, cholesterol is not a worry, and their bodies can’t tell the difference between high quality extra virgin olive oil and plain old beef fat.  The choices are infinite within those parameters though.  Grains, vegetables and most fruits should be cooked, but the proteins (except for eggs) usually can be served raw, if you so desire.  Contrary to the old wives’ tale…raw meat will not turn your dog into a killer either.

Creative cooking has no limits, and your dog’s palate may be less discerning than your significant other’s is.  All three of mine will dine quite happily on a dish of Tuesday Tuna Special, even if we weren’t interested in sharing!

Tuesday Tuna Special

  • 2 c. rice
  • 3 c. water
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 can tuna
  • 1 can green beans

Bring water to a boil, add rice and cover.  Cook on medium low heat until done (about 20 minutes for white rice.)  Remove from heat and fluff with fork.  Stir raw eggs into hot rice, replace lid and let sit for about 1 hr or until just warm.  Dump in (liquid and all) tuna and green beans.  Stir to combine.    Refrigerate or freeze unused portions until ready to use.  (Refrigerated, it will keep for about 4 days.)

Serving sizes depend on size and energy needs of individual dogs.  In addition, the high water content of this food in comparison with dry kibble makes comparing the amount of this dish fed per dog to kibble difficult–it will be a much more substantial looking serving than the kibble is.  This recipe feeds 1 large dog, 1 medium dog, and 1 toy dog at my house.  They all also love it–not even the green beans are discarded!

Paying attention on a budget

What are the best ways to ensure your pet’s health?

Pay attention!  Animals are essentially hard-wired to hide health problems, but for the observant pet owner, there are small hints that things may be going wrong.  Changes in behavior, especially in terms of eating habits, can signify serious problems.  Sleeping more can indicate other health problems.

Nutritional problems, as well as allergies/food intolerances show up often in the coat & skin.  Any sudden change is obviously a cue to pay attention.  Weight gains & losses can also be related to nutrition.  One useful tool in monitoring changes is to use photographs.

In this day & age of digital photography, it’s very easy to take many photographs.  Taking a monthly photograph at approximately the same distance & location and comparing them side by side can be a very useful tool.  Store them in a single file in your computer, labeled with the date, and it will be easier to track any changes.

Take note of changes, and to make it easier to let your veterinarian know, write them down and take the list of concerns & observations with you to the vet’s office for the appointment.  Just like when we visit the doctor, it is easy to forget details that you meant to mention (and that may be important clues for the veterinarian) while in the office.  A list makes up for that tendency.

Paying attention helps save money by catching problems early, before they become huge problems.  Often, minor issues such as the kinds related to the foods you are feeding your pet can be remedied before a veterinarian visit is required, but don’t wait too long!  If it is more than merely a food issue, it can escalate before you know it.

Comparing the photos regularly helps you know when that veterinarian visit is necessary, and can even help your veterinarian literally see what you are talking about–a great help in the diagnostic process.  It can quickly show changes in coat condition,weight, stance, and even be used to assess the seriousness of tumors and other growths that appear on our dogs, often minor disfigurements that appear with age.  Face it, our pets can’t talk and are hard wired to hide health problems, both of which make it much more difficult to diagnose problems.

Skipping veterinarian visits is not uncommon when our budgets are strained, it’s hard to justify a doctor visit for your pet when you can’t afford them for yourself either.  Don’t cut corners by avoiding vaccinations and annual exams on your pet!  These vaccinations can save your pet’s life and save you a lot of money compared to battling diseases such as distemper, parvo, etc.  Shop around for these vaccination and exam packages–there can often be a vast difference in prices even between clinics in the same general area.  It’s okay to price shop!

Doing the best we can for our pets is important, even when we are short on money.  Shopping around for vaccination packages is an excellent way to cut a corner without “doing without.”  Paying attention so that our visits to the veterinarian accomplish the most possible is another way to get the most out of our tight dollars, as accurate information can save you both time and money.

For your photographic record, try to position your pet in approximately the same position in the same location and get a profile view.  If there are areas of concern, taking a close up on a regular basis helps compare these particular spots too.  Making a habit of a top view regularly is also a good idea, and can show weight gain/loss dramatically.  Date each photo, and review them each month after you take your new set of photographs, but don’t look at them too frequently!  Examining them often will make it more difficult to truly see the changes over time.

Enjoy your pet!